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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 92 (some duplicates have been removed)
today, the woman who headed his british newspapers, rebecca brooks, often referred to as rupert murdoch's surrogate daughter, is arrested. hour later, another shocker. the head of the same department that arrested brooks falls victim to the same widening scandal. >> i have taken this decision as a consequence of the ongoing speculation and accusations relating to the mets links with news international at a senior level, and in particular in relation to mr. neal wallace, who as you know was arrested in connection with operation wheating last week. >> what brought sir paul stephenson down? his dealings with neal wallace, who had once been an executive editor of the "news of the world" paper. and that brings us to rebecca brooks. at the top of the murdoch food chain, and possibly the linchpin in an unfolding drama already ensharing britain's corridors of power. brooks is answering police questions. >> reporter: in the cozy world of british politics and media, rebecca brooks was at its very center. she wined and dined the rich and powerful on behalf of her boss and mentor, rupert mu
it to light was found dead in his home. rebecca brooks was arrested this weekend after resigning as ceo of news corp. she is expected to testify tomorrow. this is not her first time appearing before parliament, the clip i'm showing you is from 2003. watch closely. brooks testifying with andy coulson. coulson went on to become david cameron's spokesman and has since resigned and has been arrested in the scandal. >> can i ask, the one element if you ever pay the bliss for information? >> we have paid police for information in the past, and it's been -- >> will you do it in the put? >> it depends on -- >> within the code and within the law, there is a clear public interest and the same holds for private detectives, subterfuge. >> it's illegal for police officers to receive payments. >> no, no, no. i just said within the law. >> this is not only the beginning of the scandal. it's the beginning of the news corporation's attempts at damage control. coulson stepping in to blunt brooks' answers. i spoke with the other british whistleblower about the death of sean hoare and about the spread of a
-news international chief rebekah brooks will prepare to face british legislators. >>> two giants of tech as ibm powers ahead but cisco loses its way. >>> and banks lead the losses as debt ditherring continues to drag the world stock markets. >>> rupert murdoch's power and influence will be put to the test later today. he and also his son, james, will be facing uk legislators in just a few hours from now. they'll also be alongside rebekah brooks, former editor of the "news of the world." it's expected to be a harsh grilling for the three individuals over what they knew about alleged phone hacking at the london tabloid "news of the world." those allegations have done quite as much to damage rupert murdoch's reputation as they've done to "news of the world's" stock. it's been plummeting. >> the company's become the target of a hack attack itself. lulzsec is claiming a hack attack with a fake story about murdoch being found dead in his garden. in a tragic turn one of the first journalists to expose hacking at "news of the world" was found dead on monday. sean hull was former "news of the world" emp
to wolf blitzer. "situation room" starts right now. >> thanks very much, brook. >>> two weeks before the united states may plunge into financial crisis. plu, media mogul rupert murdoch is just hours away from being grilled and lambasteds by british law makers and now a whistleblower in the growing phone hackl scandal reportedly is dead. and a 77-year-old man defends his home and family from an intruder with a gun. stand by for the dramatic story. that's even more compelling because -- get this -- he's a member of the united states congress. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> the u.s. defaulting on its debt for the first time in history? we can't state it enough, this has enormous consequences for all of us, and time is quickly running out to prevent what the president calls armageddon. let's check in with kate baldwin. she's standing by with the latest. where do the negotiations stand right now? >> the two top republicans in the house. no official readout from the white house, but president obama says we are making progress when asked today by reporters how the deb
murdoch, james murdoch and rebekah brooks on how much they knew about these phone hacking allegations and when did they know it and why didn't they put a stop to it sooner or be more forthcoming. they told lawmakers earlier it was one rogue reporter, an isolated incident and it didn't did any further than that. we know of course that it turns out that thousands of people may have had phone mail messages hacked and lawmakers want to get to the bottom of how much each of them knew. >> the other question is this whistle-blower found dead yesterday tragically. police are looking into that. what is the latest there? >> reporter: what we know is that basically police have confirmed that a man was found dead at his apartment. that man is believed to be the whistle-blower for news of the world. he confirmed that the editor of the paper not only knew about the phone hacking but actively encouraged it from his reporters. he was the only whistle-blower to really go public and confirm that this was the case. now, what we understand from police is that he was found dead at his apartment while his
and small question. would you agree, ms. brooks, that part of the public concern here is about the closeness of the police and now politicians to "news of the world" and "news international?" >> i think that the public's concern overwhelmingly is the on the interception of voice mails is the idea that anybody could intercept the voice mails of victims of crime, and i think that is the overwhelming concern. >> but there has been a lot of concern voiced over the closeness of the police and the politicians and the "news of the world" and "news international" wouldn't you agree as a matter of fact? >> well, i have seen that "news of the world" has been singled out for that closeness so if you are going to address this and you know this more than anyone on the committee, because of your career as a journalist that it is wholly unfair in the discussing the closeness of police and politicians with the media to single out the "news of the world." >> well, it is a fact, and this has been a criticism and yet, you are on your watch as chief executive of "news international" have a triple whammy, becaus
. and that's starting in half-hour. then rebekah brooks who used to run murdoch's british newspaper empire until last week will answer questions. a limited number of the public are being allowed in. people were lined up at 7:00 a.m. and the line stretched around the block trying to get a seat. the police are still also under allegation of corruption. this story has so many 10 kals, many threads of inquiry even as it involves police involvement. a news of the word reporter was found dead in his home yesterday. sean was the man who originally blew the whistle on his knowledge -- his allegation that former editor of the world andy coulson was very aware of phone hacking and encouraged it. that allegation is something coulson has denied. bill there are when the testimony from mr. murdoch and his son james get underway we'll take you to that room in london, england. jamie: we are just getting word that the fbi is searching homes of the suspected hacker group anonymous. the target said to be in their late teens to early 20s. we are told the hacking group inspired by wikileaks has defaced web sit
that former editors like rebecca brooks work remains chief executive of the parent company, must have sanctioned the hacking. something she always denied. she's a close friend with prime minister david cameron, and an awkward fact, but that didn't stop him from saying this this government is making sure the fact that the public, murder victims, terror victims who had their phones hacked is disgraceful. >> reporter: one thing that went wrong for the prime minister was the decision to hire this man as communications guru, andy coulson is a former news of the world editor who lost his job at number 10 and may now be facing criminal charges. this man's son died in a terrorist attack and thinks sensitive cell phone messages were accessed by coulson's reporters. >> the thought that somebody may have been listening to me begging for david to phone home was very difficult. i thought we were in a dire place, i didn't think anybody could make it darker. >> reporter: for rupp pert murdoch the dramatic decision to close "news of the world" doesn't mean the scandal is over. there is still a police
to say that rebekah brooks has resigned as the chief executive of news international. >> more damaging details are emerging in the phone hacking scandal. other news corp properties are being implicated in the growing scandal. >> rebekah brooks resigned leaving the fight for news international's future to james and rub bert murdoch. >> rebeckah brooks was forced ot as the head of the newspapers, arrested to day by police in london in connection with the scandal. her predecessor less hinton who ran the dow jones resigned on friday. murdoch was forced to drop his $12 billion bid. the company took out full-page ads with a simple headline, we are sorry. in an interview with "the journal" murdoch says the company has made only minor mistakes in handling this debacle. joining us, from new york, michael wolf, author of a biography of rupert murdoch. david faulk ken flick and here in washington sarah smith, washington correspondent for the uk's channel 4 news. sarah smith, rebecca brooks being arrested by the police, how much does this further the damage? >> on the face of it it looks very, ver
with brooke baldwin. you got to see the launch? >> i did. this is a moment in history. we're going to remember it together, and about now the space shuttle atlantis is climbing. it's about 200 miles up in orbit chasing the international space station before it docks there early sunday morning. if you were under a rock, i don't know, if you weren't watching television this morning, we're going to replay that major moment, the moment in history, the launch. it happened just about three miles over my shoulder from launch pad 39-a. it was amazing. quite a suspense ful morning, though. we'll have that. also you're going to meet a woman as i was in the midst of thousands of spectators this morning. she was wiping away tears, talking to me about the patriotism and the poig in answer -- poignance of this last space shuttle launch. and who knows how they will next get into space. back to you. >> so this is exciting for you. >> 20 years ago. it was amazing. it was amazing. >> we'll rejoin you in just a couple minutes. thank you. >>> the other news today not so great. job gains slowed to a crawl last mon
in britain. a former top murdoch aide rebekah brooks was arrested yesterday. the top two men resigned over questions about a former news of the world reporter and a whittle blower turned up dead. stephanie gosk is covering the story. michael wolff is author of the man who knows the news inside the secret world of rupert murdoch. to the tangled web that may be the best way to describe this hacking scandal as the parties involved, murdoch's empire, government and the police all have ties one to another. it begins with rupert murdoch, the chief of news corporation, and his son james who handles european news. on friday, les hidden resigned, he ran murdoch's dow jones and published the "wall street journal." rebekah brooks ran the tabloid news of the word and went on to run news international. she quit and was arrested yesterday. brooks' deputy at news of the world was andy colson who ran the paper when much of the hacking was going on. he resigned and became top aide for prime minister who he resigned over the hacking scandal. the prime minister is also friends with rebekah brooks and james m
murdoch flew to london to guide the company through the crisis. >> it was all smiles as rebekah brooks and rupert murdoch left a restaurant last night. by allowing media access like this, news corporation is keen to convey a message that it's all business as usual. rebekah brooks stopped to help a photographer who fell over in the melee. it's understood she could soon be interviewed by police as a witness, though she says she knew nothing about phone hacking when she was editor of "news of the world." other news international exec tizz are said to be cooperating fully with the police inquiry. earlier, rupert murdoch gave a very public show of settlement to rebekah brooks. she's said to have offered her resignation twice, only to be turned down. asked what her priority was now, he said this one, referring to her. the murdoches, father and son, refused to answer any detailed questions when they faced the media. it's been a bruising few days for the murdoch empire, but even tougher days lie ahead. more revelations and more arrests are expected. the house of commons could vote to delay the
-- in his conversations with the murdoches and mrs. brooks and other people were there any mention of the bskyb bit? >> as rebecca brooks said yesterday in parliament there was never a conversation that could have been held in front of the select committee. he asked me to answer the question. perhaps he will now be transparent as he was culture secretary about all of the contacts he has had with the news international over the years. i set out the clearest possible position. it is now others to do the same. >> jay swenson. >> thank you, mr. speaker. in light of ms. brooks revelation business how cozy and close the relationship was between news international and tony blair and murdoch's secret back door meetings at number 10 in the last and present governments, does the prime minister agree that the those governments have been so reluctant to act in response to the 2003 recommendations, the 2006 information commissioner report and last year's mp's for a judiciary inquiry for phone hacking. >> people shouldn't shout the honorable lady she may give a very fair point and it doesn't ref
including rebekah brooks and james murdock on 26 separate locations. my question is whether he can assure the house that the bid was not raised at any of those meetings. was there at any time he discussed the bid with officials of the culture? >> 10 days ago, the prime minister said i was not given any specific information that would lead you to change my mind. it would have made every effort to uncover the information. they made every effort for the facts. did would surely have led him to change his mind about mr. coulson. all would decline. he was accused of making payments to police. the prime minister did nothing with the information. in may of 2010, he warned the prime minister of bringing him into downing street. he did nothing. on september the fourth 2010, the new york times published an investigation " in most civil -- quoting multiple sources. we know that article is not enough to open their increase. we know it triggers the termination of the metropolitan police. that led to the author. he said it is right that it does not taken up. the question is why. the prime minister was c
. >> >> rebekah brooks was arrested and questioned and the police commissioner resigned in connection with the case. the ongoing investigation was the topic of discussion. this is about 30 minutes. >> buying the silence of public figures that would incriminate your business and publishing confidential medical details of a disabled child to happen to have a famous father. are any of these the action of a fit and proper person? >> my honorable friend makes an extremely powerful point. i think we have to be clear about what is happening. there is a firestorm that is engulfing parts of the media, parts of the police, and political system's ability to respond. what we must do in the coming days and weeks is to think of all of the victims who are watching this today and to make doubly sure that we get to the bottom of what happened and we prosecute those who are guilty. >> about what happened to them, the hawking of the dr.'s found and be terrible treatment of "news of the world." does the prime minister agree with me that it is an insult to the family that rebekah brooks is still in her po
of the world." his son james will also give evidence, and will the former boss, rebekah brooks. the scandal has already forced two a senior police officers to resign. >> he is ben yates of the are no longer, resigning just a day after his boss, sir paul stevenson. both paying the price for failing to get to grips with the hacking scandal. so said the mayor of london. >> i regret to say i have just come off the phone john yates, who tendered his resignation. >> boras johnson said both men had jumped and were not pushed. but he made it clear he had done everything he could to encourage them. >> it is a concatenation of issues and questions. it is going to make it very difficult for them to continue to do their jobs in the way they wanted. >> yates began the day determined not to resign, telling colleagues he would not submit to trial by media. he ended it explaining why he was going. >> we in the police service are truly accountable. those of us to take on the most difficult jobs clearly have to stand up and be counted when things go wrong. sadly, there continues to be a huge amount of inaccurate
of scotland yard resigned yesterday. >> rebekah brooks was released on jail. >> rupert murdoch is said to face the scandal head-on tomorrow. >> now we move to david cameron. >> is cutting short a trip today to south africa. >> order. when are they going to do the decent thing and resign? >> congress now has 15 days to pass a bill to raise the debt ceiling before the united states government goes into a catastrophic default on august 2nd. today harry reid announced the senate will meet every day until the debt ceiling is raised. yesterday, david rogers of politico discovered and reported that house speaker john boehner and eric cantor held a secret meeting with barack obama at the white house. a republican leadership aide said "the lines of communication are being kept open, but there's nothing to report in terms of an agreement or progress." tomorrow the house republicans will hold a vote on the tea party's preferred solution to deficit reduction, the cut, cap, and balance bill, a bill that would slash spending and make raising taxes even more impossible than it seems to be now. the head of th
didn't even know when many of the key announcements were being made. that's why rebecca brooks was quite able to say at the house of commons yesterday that there wasn't a single conversation that couldn't have taken place in front of the select committee. now, i know that many people were hoping for some great allegation yesterday that could add to their fevered conspiracy theories. i'm just disappointed for them that they didn't get one. >> allen michael. >> thank you, mr. speaker. as police minister my experience of briefings from the police was that they didn't give you any operational information but they did tell you things that you needed to know. senior police officers in the metropolitan police would understand that perfectly. that's exactly what they were offering the prime minister. does he really want to be kept in the dark? why did he not -- was he angry -- sorry. as a minister i would be livid if officials were keeping information from me. >> here, here. >> did the prime minister want to be kept in the dark or is he angry with his chief of staff? >> i set this out
>> next the brookings institution forum on congressional redistricting plans that are being considered around the country. u.s. house districts are redrawn every 10 years to reflect population shifts. so far redistricting plans in 15 states have been challenged in court. over the next hour and a half panelist look at redistricting plans in california, florida and texas and how communities are being affected. >> the bewitching hour has arrived. it is 10:00 a.m.. i am tom mann, senior fellow here at workings and i'm delighted to welcome all of you with us here at brookings this morning, and to our lives c-span audience to a session entitled, a status report on congressional redistricting. now, you may have noticed on the screens, who redistricting di. wondering why that is there. we understand some of you are compelled to tweet wherever you are and if you do, we want you to know that is the event hashtag. i know you are shocked that i actually said that, norm, but there it is. >> it was written down for you. [laughter] >> eye in i am the well-known tweeter. six months ago, we
of the world" and "the sun" was a part of it. >> thank you. >> miss brooks, rupert murdoch in his evidence session said quite clearly that the responsibility for the closure of "news of the world" lay fairly and squarely with senior management of that paper, which i assume that includes you. is that the case? >> i think -- i think i may have missed that part of the evidence. i think mr. murdoch said it exactly how it was, that it was a collective decision. we all talked together. mr. murdoch was abroad at the time at a conference. we all talked together -- >> is that mr. murdoch senior? >> sorry, yes, rupert murdoch. yes. >> you wanted to say something else? >> no. sorry. >> when you were advising your staff that the paper was closing, during the private session, i think you said something like there was more to come. would you like to expand on what you meant by that? >> when i went down to the newsroom, to explain the decision, clearly and quite rightly, the journalists on the "news of the world" who very honorable journalists who have been putting out a newspaper under the scrutiny for
am aware of that mr. brooks or mr. heaton had knowledge of. certainly her knowledge of those things has not been clear. i have seen no evidence of impropriety. >> [unintelligible] is that right? >> yes. >> in october of 2010, did you still believe it when you said you would vigorously pursue the truth? >> yes. >> if you were not worrying bend? >> i do not know. >> you acknowledge they you were misled? >> yes. >> are you aware that in march [unintelligible] police? >> i was not aware at the time. it had been amended. >> if you were anyone else in the organization? investigating it at the time? explaining why? >> let me say something. this is not an excuse. this is less than 1% of the company. distinguished people and professionals. >> [unintelligible] what i am trying to establish is paca how your wrongdoing was -- establish is how your wrongdoing was established at the time. were you made aware of [unintelligible] >> [unintelligible] >> what did they do, subsequent to the arrest? >> i told the investigators and eventually they investigated further. >> what did you do to investigate
. the sound heard more often was silence. >> were you -- about your son or rebekah brooks? >> that took 10 seconds to answer. he hesitated on every question of detail. >> i forget but i expect that i have been in daily contact with both of them. >> news international was run day today by james murdoch. today, he blamed the police, complaints commission, and a failed inquiry for the failure to reveal what had gone wrong. >> if i knew then what i know now and with the benefit of hindsight, we would have taken more action are around that and we would have been quicker to get to the bottom of the allegations. >> out different -- how different today was then the days when he was feted by prime ministers. david cameron was never photographed with mr. murdoch even though he was invited discretely just days after the last election. >> why did you go in the back? >> to avoid photographers. i did as i was told. >> he was looking relaxed, then may ham. the drama turned into a circus. >> he was there in that room. what can you tell us? >> i was sitting a few feet away and only just half a second befor
of the world." >> thank you. >> miss brooks, rupert murdoch in his evidence session said the responsibility for the closure of "news of the world" laid fairly and square leon the management of the newspaper, which would include you. is that the case? >> i think i may have missed that part of the evidence. i think mr. murdoch said is exactly how it was. it was a collective decision. we all talked together, and mr. murdoch was in with the board at the time, >> yes, rupert murdoch, yes. >> during the private session i think you said something like there was more to come. would you like to expand what you meant by that? >> when i went down to the newsroom to explain the decision, and clearly and quite rightly the journalists on the "news of the world" who are very honorable and journalists who will been putting out a newspaper under the scrutiny for a longtime and with great pride in their newspaper were very sad and baffled by management's decision to close the paper. what i was saying to them is that right now you may not be able to right at this moment understand why we've done it, but i thi
. >> as for the questions about -- >> on the case of backup brooks -- rebecca brooks, i do not think the prime minister should choose who should run it news organizations. >> david cameron has done his best to try to distance himself from the scandal. questions about his own judgment and his friendship continue. especially now some say they warned him years ago about hiring the former editor. >> president obama, the u.s. economy has been the overriding challenge. today, it comes more disappointing news. only 18,000 jobs were created in june, the fewest in nine months. that pushed up the unemployment rate to 9.2%. in response, the president had this assessment. >> economy is not producing enough jobs for everybody was looking. we have always known that we would have ups and downs. over the past few months, the economy has experienced some tough head winds. >> what more can be done to spur the job growth? how could these figures have fallen so far below expectations? >> a date earlier, many economists are revising upward their forecast. they were expecting around 100,000 jobs to a been created in the mon
today. rebekah brooks, former editor of news of the world testified. she was arrested sunday amid allegations that the tabloid was paying off police. she this wasn't the first time she was questioned. police payoffs have come up time and time again over the years. i'll play her testimony from today in a moment, but let's look back at what she had to say back in 2003. >> can i just ask of whether you ever pay the police? >> excuse me? >> do you ever pay the police for information? >> we have paid the police for information in the past. >> and will you do it in the future? >> it depends on -- >> we operate within the code and within the law. there is a clear public interest, and same holds for private detectives, subterfuge, whatever you want to talk about. >> it's illegal. >> no, no, no. as i said, within the law. >> over the years, brooks has tried to back away from that testimony. but it came up again today when the former editor was asked to clarify exactly what she meant by the statement. here is what she had to say. >> i can say that it -- i have never paid a policeman myself,
-- >> i'm not aware of that particular phrase. >> rebekah brooks, murdoch's former new york chief as appeared. she resigned on friday. brooks denies responsibility for the alleged hack being at the newspaper she once ran and insists she was shocked and disgusted when she heard reports about murdered school girls' phone being tapped. >> of course i have regrets. the idea that millie's phone was accessed by someone being paid by "news of the world" is abhorrent to me as it is to everyone in this room. and this is an ultimate regret that the speed in which we have found out and tried to find out the bottom of this investigation has been too slow. >> it's not clear if rupert murdoch helped or hurt his cause with his testimony. many observers felt that he looked old even foggy at times. this tweet from howard kurtz, quote, every detail of scandal that rupert says he's not familiar with makes him look more disengaged as a ceo. >> murdoch looked out of it. he looked like a ceo whose not in touch with what's is going on in his own company even as the evidence began to mount of wrongdoing
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 92 (some duplicates have been removed)